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Can Polio Be The Answer To DIPG Treatment?

DIPG Treatment, Poliovirus

“Science knows no country, because knowledge belongs to humanity, and is the torch which illuminates the world,” said Louis Pasteur whose discoveries has saved the lives of many people.

Today, even though we are moving forward technologically at the speed of light, we still have a very long way to go. Finding a cure and researching better treatments for DIPG is the need of the hour. As many researchers and good-hearted Samaritans are doing their best to find a cure for DIPG, a team of scientists has found a new way to treat it in the study named, “Recombinant Attenuated Poliovirus Immunization Vectors Targeting H3.3 K27M in DIPG.”

A team of researchers at Duke University in North Carolina, led by Dr. David Ashley have developed an immunotherapy treatment that could be used in the future to treat DIPG. The study that began in 2017, targets the H3.3 K27M mutation in DIPG by modifying the poliovirus. This mutation is found in 80% of the DIPG tumors.

If successful, the scientists plan to use this treatment as a vaccine through injection into a muscle to trigger immune responses towards the mutant H3.3 K27M gene. This mutation is also present in other high-grade childhood tumors.

The efforts of these researchers were featured on two segments in CBS’ 60 Seconds. Dr. David Ashley who is the Director of Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumour Centre was awarded a research grant due to the combined efforts of ChadTough Foundation and Michael Mosier Defeat DIPG Foundation. More than 3 million dollars were required for researching this one method alone. Imagine the amount of money that would be required for multiple research methods and ultimately to find a cure for DIPG. Only through our joint, consistent efforts, we will be able to say goodbye to DIPG and give the gift of life to children.

Join Marc Jr Foundation’s efforts to raising awareness about DIPG and finding a cure for it.

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Sources (1, 2, 3)

Read more:

What Is Convection-Enhanced Delivery (CED)? How Does It Play A Role In The Treatment Of DIPG?

How To Make Your Child Feel Better While Facing DIPG?

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5 Things About DIPG That Will Help Us Understand It

Marc Jr Foundation, Marc Junior Foundation

Famous philosopher Voltaire said, “God gave us the gift of life; it is up to us to give ourselves the gift of living well.” It is difficult to have a positive outlook when your child is facing a rare tumor-like DIPG (Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma) but it is necessary. It is the quality of life that matters the most, no matter how long it is. When facing DIPG, one of the greatest challenges we face is the lack of knowledge about it. These seven things will help us understand it better.

1. DIPG affects children majorly, it is uncommon in adults.

About 300-350 cases of DIPG are diagnosed every year in the United States, out of which most are in children aged below ten. Both boys and girls are equally affected. (source)

2. The disease occurs in a delicate area of the brainstem that controls critical body functions.

DIPG occurs in the “pons” of the brainstem of a person. The pons is a structure located in the upper part of the brainstem that controls functions like breathing, senses like hearing and taste, body balance, communication between different sections of the brain etc.

3. The symptoms of DIPG can appear suddenly.

Typical MRI appearance of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) | Katherine E. Warren (2012) [CC BY 3.0]
A pontine glioma, DIPG grows rapidly. Some of the early symptoms include sudden hearing problems, nausea, headache, vomiting, problems with movements of the eyes and eyelids, weakness in the face and the limbs, loss of balance, problems in chewing and swallowing food among others.

4. A cure has not been found for DIPG yet.

 

Treatments like radiotherapy help with the symptoms of DIPG by shrinking the tumor but they do not cure it. Despite ongoing research, no definite cure has been found. Research conducted by Dr. Mark Souweidane of St. Baldrick has come close to finding a cure through injecting a high concentration of cancer-fighting drug directly into the tumor. (reference)

5. Awareness, acceptance and comforting can go a long way in helping to deal with DIPG.

As the awareness of this rare tumor is scarce, it is difficult for families facing DIPG to understand and face the disease. Accepting that your child is facing DIPG will help you comfort them and make it a little easier. Simple comforting techniques like giving them their favorite soft toys, cuddling with them under a blanket like Quility, or watching a superhero movie with them will help.

Quility Premium Kids Weighted Blanket & Removable Cover
Quility Premium Kids Weighted Blanket & Removable Cover

The Marc Junior Foundation has been helping families dealing with DIPG by offering educational and financial assistance, along with making efforts to fund research to find a cure. Get in touch with us for more information, donate today to make a difference.

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